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2016 Chicago Bears Yearbook

CHIICAGO BEARS HISTORICAL BIOGRAPHIES GEORGE S. HALAS, JR. September 4, 1925 — December 16, 1979 George S. “Mugs” Halas was an integral part of the Bears before his untimely death in 1979. The son of pro football founder George S. Halas, Mugs spent 30 years in pro football. He joined the Bears’ front office in 1950, was named treasurer in 1953, and became president of the club in 1963. In his first season as president, the Bears were NFL champions. Mugs was the second of just four presidents in the franchise’s 93-year history. He succeeded his father, George S. Halas, and was followed by Michael McCaskey and current president Ted Phillips. His numerous contributions on a league-level included membership on the executive committee of the NFL Management Council. Mugs learned football at a young age, serving as a ball boy while growing up. He earned a business degree from Loyola in 1949, before entering pro football on a full-time basis. Mugs is remembered for his love and devotion to the game. EDWARD W. MCCASKEY April 27, 1919 — April 8, 2003 Edward (Ed) W. McCaskey served as an executive with the Bears for 36 years, serving as Chairman Emeritus of the club from 1999 until his death in 2003. He was the team’s second Chairman of the Board, succeeding team founder George Halas in 1983 following 17 years as the team’s Vice President and Treasurer. McCaskey married Halas’ only daughter, Virginia, in 1943 and joined the team at Halas’ request in 1967. McCaskey was a popular figure within the NFL and was referred to by many as the conscience of the League, as well as a sounding board for many of its leaders. He contributed to numerous charitable and civic organziations on behalf of the Bears and served as the guiding force behind the Brian Piccolo Fund. CHICAGO BEARS 166 2 0 1 6 Y E A R B O O K HALAS’ BEARS RECORDS • Longest run with opponent’s fumble: 98 yards, TD (11/4/23) NFL COACHING RECORDS • Most World Champions: 6* (1921, 1933, 1940, 1941, 1946, 1963) BEARS COACHING RECORDS • Most regular season wins: 318 • Most consecutive regular season victories: 17 (1933-34) • Most consecutive wins (including post-season): 18 (1933-34) • Most World Champions: 6 (1921, 1933, 1940, 1941, 1946, 1963) *Tied with “Curly” Lambeau PAYTON’S PRO STATS Year Rush Yds Avg Lg TD Rec Yds Avg Lg TD G-GS 1975 Bears 196 679 3.5 54 7 33 213 6.5 40 0 13-7 1976 Bears 311 1,390 4.5 60 13 15 149 9.9 34 0 14-14 1977 Bears 339 1,852 5.5 73 14 27 269 10.0 75 2 14-14 1978 Bears 333 1,395 4.2 76 11 50 480 9.5 61 0 16-16 1979 Bears 369 1,610 4.4 43 14 31 313 10.1 65 2 16-16 1980 Bears 317 1,460 4.6 69 6 46 367 8.0 54 1 16-16 1981 Bears 339 1,222 3.6 39 6 41 379 9.2 30 2 16-16 1982 Bears 148 596 4.0 26 1 32 311 9.7 40 0 9-9 1983 Bears 314 1,421 4.5 49 6 53 607 11.5 74 2 16-16 1984 Bears 381 1,684 4.4 72 11 45 368 8.2 31 0 16-16 1985 Bears 324 1,551 4.8 40 9 49 483 9.9 65 2 16-16 1986 Bears 321 1,333 4.2 41 8 37 382 10.3 57 3 16-16 1987 Bears 146 533 3.7 17 4 33 217 6.6 16 1 12-12 Career 3,838 16,726 4.4 76 110 492 4,538 9.2 75 15 190-184 Other Career Stats: Passing: 11-34-331, 8 TDs, 5 int’s. Punting: 1 for 39 yards (1975). Kickoff Returns: 17 for 539 yards (31.7 avg.). PLAYOFFS Year Rush Yds Avg LG TD Rec Yds Avg LG TD G-GS 1977 Bears 19 60 3.1 11 0 3 33 11.0 20 0 1-1 1979 Bears 16 67 4.2 12 2 3 52 17.3 31 0 1-1 1984 Bears 46 196 4.3 20 0 4 23 5.8 12 0 2-2 1985 Bears 67 186 2.8 12 0 8 52 6.5 19 0 3-3 1986 Bears 14 38 2.7 9 0 1 -2 -2.0 -2 0 1-1 1987 Bears 18 85 4.7 16 0 3 20 6.7 9 0 1-1 Career 180 632 3.5 20 2 22 178 8.1 31 0 9-9 Also: 3 kickoff returns for 57 yards in 1977. Leading the Chicago Bears for more than a halfcentury, George S. Halas, the team’s founder and head coach for 40 years, was one of the most enduring personalities in sports history. Halas was active with the Bears starting in 1920 when he founded the team as the Decatur Staleys. Halas was born and raised on Chicago’s west side and prepped at Crane Tech High School before attending the University of Illinois. In Champaign, he earned a B.S. degree while lettering in football, basketball and baseball. After graduation in 1918, Halas joined the Navy for the first of two tours of duty. He was named Player of the Game in the 1919 Rose Bowl, playing end on the Great Lakes team that beat the Marines 17-0. A commander when he left active duty in 1946, Halas retired as a captain in the Naval Reserve. He was also awarded the Distinguished Citizens Award– the highest honor the Navy can bestow on a civilian. After leaving the Navy, Halas played right field for the New York Yankees, but a hip injury shortened his baseball career. Halas went to work for a Decatur (IL) corn products firm owned by an enthusiastic sports fan, Mr. A.E. Staley, who sponsored a semi-pro baseball team, and later commissioned Halas to organize an independent football team. PRO CAREER: As a player, Halas set an NFL record (which stood 49 years until 1972) when he took a Jim Thorpe fumble 98 yards for a TD in a 26-0 win over the Oorang Indians at Cubs Park (11/4/23). He played end for the Bears from 1920-29 and was named to the NFL all-pro squad of the 1920s. PRO COACHING CAREER: Three times Halas interrupted his coaching activities by his own volition. He first turned over the leadership to Ralph Jones from 1930 through 1932. In 1942 when he left for the Navy, Luke Johnsos and Heartley “Hunk” Anderson shared head coaching responsibilities until ’45. John “Paddy” Driscoll coached in 1956-57. Coincidentally, in ’33 and again in ’46 when Halas resumed coaching, his Bears won world championships. During the 1940s, his teams reached the height of their power with four straight Western Conference titles; three world championships; a fantastic fourseason record (including pre-season games) of 62-7-1 (.899); scored 2,164 points and allowed just 842. The 1940 team, which defeated the Washington Redskins 73-0 for the World Championship, was voted the greatest professional team of all-time by the National Academy of Sports Editors in 1963. Resuming coaching in 1958, Halas needed five years to develop another champion, when in 1963 the Bears won their eighth championship. The Sporting News, AP, and UPI named him Coach of the Year after the 1963 and 1965 seasons. Halas retired from coaching on May 27, 1968, with a career record of 324-151-31. His win total was the best in NFL history until Don Shula broke the mark in 1993. Halas is a charter member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. GEORGE S. HALAS February 2, 1895 — October 31, 1983 WALTER PAYTON July 25, 1954 — November 1, 1999 • Drafted 4th overall in 1975; Retired after the 1987 season • Retired as NFL’s all-time leader in rushing and combined net yards • Held 16 NFL Records when he retired including the League’s all-time leading rusher, which was surpassed by Emmitt Smith in 2002 • Voted to nine Pro Bowls (1977, 78, 79, 80, 81, 84, 85, 86, 87) • Holds 27 Bears Records (24 regular season/career, three postseason) • Jersey #34 is retired; Elected to Hall of Fame, Jan. 30, 1993; Inducted July 31, 1993


2016 Chicago Bears Yearbook
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