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2016 Chicago Bears Yearbook

CHIICAGO BEARS COACHES In 2014, Fox led the Broncos to a 12-4 record as they were the only team in the NFL to finish in the top 5 in both total offense (fourth) and total defense (third), the second time in three years Denver accomplished that feat. Manning finished with a 100-plus passer rating for his third-straight season under Fox, a feat the Pro Bowl quarterback accomplished only one other time in his career (2004-06). Over the final 6 weeks of the 2014 regular season, running back C.J. Anderson led the NFL with 648 rushing yards and 8 rushing touchdowns. In 2013, Denver earned the AFC’s top playoff seed for the second consecutive year after a 13-3 regular season record. After defeating AFC West rival San Diego and No. 2 seeded New England in the playoffs, the Broncos garnered their first Super Bowl appearance in 15 years. In his second year with the Broncos in 2012, Fox led the club to a 13-3 record and the top seed in the AFC playoffs. Denver ended the regular season by recording 11 consecutive wins by at least seven points, the third team in NFL history to accomplish that feat. Despite fielding a young squad during his initial campaign with Denver in 2011, Fox led the Broncos to their first AFC West title and playoff victory in six years. He finished third in the Associated Press’ NFL Coach of the Year voting after becoming only the third head coach since the 1970 NFL merger to lead a team to a division title and playoff victory in his first year with a franchise after inheriting a club that won four or fewer games the previous year. Fox guided the Broncos to six consecutive wins following a 1-4 start while tying an NFL record by winning six games when trailing or tied entering the fourth quarter. The offense set a club single-season record by averaging an NFL-best 164.5 rushing yards per game. Fox worked with linebacker Von Miller, who was named AP’s NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year while overseeing a Denver rookie class that totaled the second-most starts (56) in the league. Prior to his time with the Broncos, Fox spent nine years as head coach of the Carolina Panthers. He led the franchise to a 73-71 (.507) regular-season record, including three playoff appearances and two NFC South titles. The Panthers went 5-3 in the postseason under Fox, including winning four road playoff games, while appearing in two NFC Championship Games and earning the franchise’s first Super Bowl appearance. The four playoff road victories are tied for fifth most in NFL history and tied for fourth most by a head coach with one team. During Fox’s time as Carolina’s head coach, the Panthers defense was third in the NFL with 282 takeaways, fifth in total defense (312.0 ypg) and ninth in scoring defense (20.1 ppg). The Panthers ranked in the NFL’s top 10 in scoring defense in five of his nine seasons as head coach (fifth in 2002 and 2005, 10th in 2003, tied for eighth in 2006 and ninth in 2009) and in the top eight in total defense on five occasions (second in 2002, eighth in 2003 and 2009, third in 2005 and seventh in 2006). Fox guided 15 different Panthers to a total of 28 Pro Bowl selections from 2002-10. Defensive end Julius Peppers led the way with five Pro Bowl selections (2004-06, ’08-09) during his time in Carolina in addition to being named to the 2000s NFL All-Decade Team and Associated Press NFL Rookie of the Year in 2002. In addition to Peppers, five other Panthers were voted to multiple Pro Bowls under Fox’s leadership: linebacker Jon Beason (2008-10), offensive tackle Jordan Gross (2008, ’10), defensive tackle Kris Jenkins (2002-03, ’06), center Ryan Kalil (2009-10) and wide receiver Steve Smith (2005-06, ’08). Fox inherited a Panthers team that went 1-15 and guided them to a 7-9 record in his first year at the helm of the franchise before an 11-5 record, NFC South title and NFC Championship in 2003, en route to advancing to Super Bowl XXXVIII. Fox joined Pro Football Hall of Fame coaches Vince Lombardi and Bill Parcells as the only coaches in NFL history to take over a one-win team and lead it to the postseason in just two years. During their playoff run in 2003, the Panthers won two contests on the road, a 29-23 overtime victory in St. Louis and a 14-3 win in Philadelphia during the NFC Championship Game. A catalyst of the Panthers quick turnaround was Fox’s improvement of Carolina’s defense which was last in yards allowed (371.4 per game) a year before his arrival to No. 2 overall in 2002 (290.4 ypg), the only defensive unit since the 1970 NFL merger to accomplish that feat. Carolina returned to the NFC Championship Game three seasons later in 2005 after the Panthers finished with the NFL’s third-ranked defense (282.6 ypg) and earned two more road victories in the postseason, shutting out New York, 23-0, and defeating Chicago, 29-21. Similar to his time in Denver, Fox guided teams with different offensive identities at Carolina. His squads were compiled of four individual 1,000-yard rushing seasons (DeAngelo Williams-2, Stephen Davis-1, Jonathan Stewart-1), seven individual 1,000-yard receiving outputs (Steve Smith-4, Muhsin Muhammad-3) and four 3,000-yard passing seasons from quarterback Jake Delhomme. CHICAGO BEARS 18 2 0 1 6 Y E A R B O O K


2016 Chicago Bears Yearbook
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